Jul 26th 2019

Stainless Steel World News (8/19)

Considered to be the very first super duplex stainless steel on the market, Ferralium® 255 was launched in 1969 by Langley Alloys. After 50 years of successful application and continuous development, the history of this unique alloy is shared in further detail.

View full article
Jul 23rd 2019

What is S32760?

The origins of Alloy 32760 can be traced back to the development of the trademarked alloy Zeron 100 by Mather & Platt. This Manchester, England based foundry supplied castings for a number of applications, but this alloy was developed primarily for their product range of centrifugal pumps for the oil and gas industry. The Zeron […]

View full article
Jul 22nd 2019

Duplex, Super Duplex and Hyper Duplex

The development of duplex alloys has followed a trajectory of increasing alloy content and increasing levels of corrosion resistance and yield strength, from duplex to super duplex, to hyper duplex.   The origin of duplex stainless steels can be traced back to the 1930s. Aggressive process environments in pulp and papermaking mills in Sweden spurred […]

View full article
Jul 12th 2019

Grants for Growth

Langley Alloys approached the Grants for Growth team at Stoke-on-Trent City Council for help with funding for a new capital expenditure project. Langley Alloys were looking to purchase an additional CNC lathe to increase the company’s capacity and allow them to provide extra services to their customers. As part of their investment, the company created […]

View full article
Jul 12th 2019

What is precipitation hardening?

The process of solution annealing is applied to most alloys after their final forging or rolling process. By holding the particular alloy at a relatively high temperature for several hours – typically around 1000degC – all of the different elements within the alloy are absorbed into the solid solution. By then immediately quenching the bar or plate, the structure is retained at room temperature.

However, with the encouragement of time spent at elevated temperatures, the solubility of certain elements in the alloy will change. This means that precipitates – combinations of selected elements – come out solution and appear as small particles distributed throughout the alloys microstructure. The precipitate particles act to ‘pin’ grain boundaries within the microstructure of the alloy, which hinders their movement when the alloy is being strained. This increases the yield strength of the alloy. Depending upon the combination of temperature and time used for the ageing heat treatment, both the number, size and distribution of precipitates can vary. Therefore, it is possible to produce a range of different strength levels within the same alloy composition, purely by altering the temperature and time of the ageing heat treatment.

View full article
Jul 4th 2019

What is API 6ACRA?

API 6A CRA is a supplement to API 6A, covering a group of high-performance alloys – specifically age-hardened nickel alloys, which includes Alloy 718, Alloy 725 and Alloy 925 as well as Alloys 716, 935 and 945.  From a material supplier’s perspective, it covers the most relevant aspects of the metals properties: production route, chemical […]

View full article